Socialite Jamie Chua gifts 21-year-old son Range Rover which costs over $270,000

25 November 2015 / 11 months 1 week ago

Image: Jamie Chua Instagram

Jocelyn Lee
The New Paper
Nov 22, 2015

She is no stranger to the high life, but socialite Jamie Chua says she does not believe in splurging on her children.

"If I pamper my kids by giving them extravagant gifts at the snap of my finger, they will grow up not learning anything," she tells The New Paper on Sunday.

Ms Chua's daughter, Calista, is 17, and son, Cleveland, is 21. The 42-year-old socialite (@ec24m) has been profiled often for her multimillion-dollar closets, which include about 200 Hermes Birkin and Kelly bags and double-digit carat diamond accessories.

She says: "I don't want to spoon-feed them and watch them grow up to be overly dependent on their parents. It is not good."

The most expensive present Ms Chua has given her son is a Range Rover, which costs over $270,000. She also buys him Givenchy and Valentino shoes that cost more than $1,000 a pair.

These are footwear brands that he wears regularly.

Ms Chua, who owns a Lamborghini, shares that her son had bugged her to buy him an exotic supercar too. But she rejected his request as she feels he is still too young.

"Sometimes, I let him drive my Lamborghini but only when I am in the car with him. If he speeds, I usually close my eyes and scream very loudly as I hate it when people drive too fast," she says.

"I also allow him to drive my Lambo to the bus stop to pick his friend up, or drive around the estate. That's all. I don't trust him enough to let him drive it out on his own yet."


The entrepreneur, who started her own beauty line, Luminous1 by Jamie Chua, in April, also buys Chanel handbags for her daughter at $6,000 each.

She says: "My daughter has access to my Hermes bags, but she doesn't use them as she finds them too old. We have very different tastes. When she is older, she will inherit my jewellery collection.

"Other than that, I don't lavish them with gifts. In fact, I always nag at them and tell them that they need to work hard to earn their own keep."

She says: "I don't want my children to laze around and think that money can just fall from the sky."  

This article was first published on Nov 22, 2015.
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