Emily Ratajkowski slams double standards between men and women who act sexy

7 September 2016 / 1 month 2 weeks ago

Emily Ratajkowski has slammed double standards in the entertainment industry.

The 'We Are Your Friends' hitmaker says women are unfairly blasted for acting sexy whilst men are celebrated for the same reasons.

She shared: "Look at pop culture: Mick Jagger is 73, and he still sometimes wears his shirt open and gyrates onstage. We understand that this is a part of his performance and artistic brand.

"Meanwhile, when Madonna, who is 58 and a revolutionary in that same kind of artistic sexuality, wears a sheer dress to the Met Gala, critics call her 'a hot mess' who's 'desperate'.

"But isn't she just making one of her signature political statements about female sexuality (and, incidentally, about our ageist, sexist culture too)? In any case, they are both performers who undoubtedly like attention.

"So why does Madonna get flak for it while Jagger is celebrated?"

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The 25-year-old actress went on to insist both men and women like to be the centre of attention.

She added: "It's absurd to think that desire for attention doesn't drive both women and men. Why are women scrutinized for it more, then?

"And if a woman dresses up because she does want attention, male or otherwise, does that make her guilty of something? Or less 'serious'?

"Our society doesn't question men's motivations for taking their shirt off, or shaving, or talking about politics - nor should it. Wanting attention is genderless. It's human."

And Emily urged for society to get a better understanding of how they see both men and women.

Writing for Glamour magazine, she explained: "The ideal feminist world shouldn't be one where women suppress their human instincts for attention and desire. We shouldn't be weighed down with the responsibility of explaining our every move.

"We shouldn't have to apologize for wanting attention either. We don't owe anyone an explanation. It's not our responsibility to change the way we are seen - it's society's responsibility to change the way it sees us."

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