Is everything okay with Van Ness Wu's marriage? His wife posts cryptic messages online

26 April 2014 / 2 years 6 months ago
The New Paper
Saturday, Apr 26, 2014

G-Dragon and Kiko Mizuhara aren't the only high-profile showbiz couple whose recent unfollowing of each other on Instagram has set tongues wagging.

Taiwanese actor-singer Van Ness Wu, 36, and his Singaporean jewellery designer wife Arissa Cheo, 32 - who hosted a wedding dinner at the St Regis Hotel here in January after a seven-year on-off romance - did just that recently and also changed their Instagram usernames.


In the past week, Ms Cheo posted messages like: "The biggest mistake I have made in my life is letting people stay in my life far longer than they deserve" and "Don't stress over s*** you can't change", prompting fans to ask her if their marriage is okay.

Her response was fierce, telling them to unfollow her if they think everything she posts is about Wu.

She has not posted any photos of them together in the past two months, when previously she'd post couple snapshots regularly.

Whether the newlyweds' cryptic social media activities are signs of trouble in paradise or not, they appeared two weeks ago in an exclusive cover story for the April issue of Prestige Singapore.

Both Wu and Ms Cheo uploaded a photo of the magazine cover onto their Instagram accounts.

In the feature, they sang praises of each other, with Wu saying that what he loves most about his wife is her "fierce but gentle and yet so giving" heart, and Ms Cheo saying that she loved him for his "giving heart and childlike innocence".

Wu said: "I had the ring for a good one year before I proposed. I always knew it would be for her."

The couple took a pragmatic approach to the ups and downs of a love story.

Ms Cheo said: "People also have this idealistic view of love. But we have to remember that love is not perfect."

Wu reiterated: "Which is why during the wedding, we shared this quote with everyone: 'Love is not about loving the perfect person, but loving the imperfect person perfectly'."

This article was published on April 24 in The New Paper.

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