Brittany Murphy's death case will not re-open despite new toxicology reports

22 November 2013 / 2 years 11 months ago

Brittany Murphy's cause of death is not being re-investigated despite new toxicology reports suggesting she could have been poisoned.

Despite new toxicology reports suggesting the 'Clueless' actress may have been poisoned, the Los Angeles County coroner has announced there are no plans to re-open the case because they are yet to receive them, after the star died in December 2009.

Her husband Simon Monjack died just five months later and both deaths were attributed to acute pneumonia and severe anemia; hers also involved multiple drug intoxication.

Chief Coroner Investigator and Chief of Operations Craig Harvey told The Huffington Post in an email: "The Los Angeles County Department of Medical Examiner-Coroner has no plans to reopen our inquiry into the deaths. We stand by our original reports.

"We have not been presented any [third] party lab test results for analysis, so we are unable to comment on publicised reports of private lab tests."

Mr Harvey also spoke with said Brittany's father, Angelo Bertolotti, hasn't provided adequate documentation yet, after reportedly securing the release of the 32-year-old's hair, blood and tissues for independent analysis.

The results are said to have shown the presence of 10 heavy metals commonly found in rat poison.

There have been many conspiracy theories surrounding the two deaths, including mould and murder by government spies.

Mr Harvey added: "We take any allegations of homicide seriously, but just screaming about a test result without allowing us to look at the test result and what it means is not going to be helpful."

A toxicology expert looked at the results and called the findings "ridiculous" in an interview with CNN, saying multiple dye treatments alone would change the chemistry of Murphy's hair.

Assistant Chief Coroner Ed Winter told that officials could exhume Brittany's body with a court order if evidence is presented showing she didn't die of natural causes.

Although her father could have the body exhumed privately without a court order.

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